SilentSeas Group | Alcohol Addiction: Signs, Complications, and Recovery
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Alcohol Addiction: Signs, Complications, and Recovery

Alcohol Addiction: Signs, Complications, and Recovery

struggling with alcohol addiction

Encourage your loved one to develop new hobbies and interests that don’t involve drinking. Your role doesn’t end when your loved agrees to seek help. Recovery is an ongoing process, requiring time and patience. Someone who abuses alcohol will not magically become a different person once they’re sober.

struggling with alcohol addiction

They are led by health professionals and supported by studies showing they can be beneficial. Alcohol abuse and addiction doesn’t just affect the person drinking—it affects their families and loved ones, too. Watching a family member struggle with a drinking problem can be as heartbreakingly painful as it is frustrating. But while you can’t do the hard work of overcoming addiction for your loved one, your love and support can play a crucial part in their long-term recovery.

This is of particular concern when you’re taking certain medications that also depress the brain’s function. As a parent or guardian, it’s normal to feel scared, angry, or confused if you discover your child is drinking. But it’s important to remember that you still have a major impact on the choices that your child makes, especially during their preteen and early teen years.

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Listening to others facing the same challenges can serve as a tremendous source of comfort and support, and help you develop new tools for coping. Alateen is a similar support group specifically for teens who have a family member abusing alcohol. In most places, it’s legal and socially acceptable for an adult to enjoy an alcoholic drink. There’s no specific amount that indicates someone has an alcohol use disorder. Rather, it’s defined by how drinking affects your loved one’s life. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and other 12-step programs provide peer support for people quitting or cutting back on their drinking.

Worrying and stressing about your loved one can take a toll on your mind and body, so find ways to relieve the pressure. Eating right, exercising regularly, and sleeping well can all help to keep stress in check. You can also try one of HelpGuide’s guided audio meditations to help you stay calm and focused as you make this challenging journey.

Remember, though, that relationships with doctors, therapists, and other health professionals can take time to develop. Alcohol recovery is a process—one that often involves setbacks. A drinking relapse doesn’t mean you’re a failure or that you’ll never be able gabapentin: uses dosage side effects warnings to reach your goal. Each drinking relapse is an opportunity to learn and recommit to sobriety, so you’ll be less likely to relapse in the future. Someone with an alcohol addiction who has remained sober for months or years may find themselves drinking again.

  1. Children who grow up with a parent with AUD are more likely to misuse alcohol themselves later in life.
  2. Simply understanding the different options can be an important first step.
  3. Offer to help out with work, childcare, and household tasks if they get in the way of treatment sessions.
  4. Choose the right time to have this important conversation.

Don’t blame yourself if the first intervention isn’t successful. The most successful treatment happens when a person wants to change. Treatment of alcohol use disorder is an ongoing process.

This may mean giving up certain friends and social connections. These complications are reasons why it’s important to treat alcohol addiction early. Nearly all risks involved with alcohol addiction may be avoidable alcohol intolerance after covid or treatable, with successful long-term recovery. Too much alcohol affects your speech, muscle coordination and vital centers of your brain. A heavy drinking binge may even cause a life-threatening coma or death.

Alcohol withdrawal symptoms

Theories suggest that for certain people drinking has a different and stronger impact that can lead to alcohol use disorder. Intoxication can also present other unpredictable events, including physical dangers. When under the influence, your loved one may become angry and lash out. They likely don’t even realize they’re behaving this way, and they may not remember once the effects of the alcohol wear off.

struggling with alcohol addiction

Similarly, the roughly 95,000 deaths each year in the U.S. attributed to alcohol represent a fraction of high-risk drinkers. While tragic, the 100,000 fatal drug overdoses last year actually claimed the lives of a tiny percentage of the 31.9 million Americans who use illegal drugs. “We are literally surrounded by people who are in recovery from a substance-use disorder, but we don’t know it,” Kelly said.

Supporting your loved one’s recovery

Combined with treatment led by health professionals, mutual-support groups can offer a valuable added layer of support. Help your loved one plan how they’re going to avoid triggers to drink, deal with alcohol cravings, and cope in social situations where there’s pressure to drink. All you can do is encourage the person to recommit to overcoming their drinking problem and support them as they try again. If you recognize the warning signs that your loved one has a problem with alcohol, the first step to helping them is to learn all you can about addiction and alcohol abuse. Other ways to get help include talking with a mental health professional or seeking help from a support group such as Alcoholics Anonymous or a similar type of self-help group.

That means you’ll need plenty of patience when supporting your loved one’s recovery. Overcoming an addiction to alcohol can be a long and bumpy road. And you don’t have to wait until you hit rock bottom; you can make a change at any time. Whether you want to quit drinking altogether or cut down to healthier levels, these guidelines can help you get started on the road to recovery today.

If you know someone who has first-hand knowledge of the program, it may help to ask about his or her personal experience. Professionals in the alcohol treatment field offer advice on what to consider when choosing a treatment program. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved three medications for treating alcohol dependence, and others are being tested to determine whether they are effective. Some are surprised to learn that there are medications on the market approved to treat alcohol dependence. The newer types of these medications work by offsetting changes in the brain caused by AUD.

Coping and support

Let friends, family members, and co-workers know that you’re trying to stop or cut back on drinking. If they drink, ask them to support your recovery by not doing so in front of you. Treatment for alcohol use disorder can vary, depending on your needs. Treatment may involve a brief intervention, individual or group counseling, an outpatient program, or a residential inpatient stay. Working to stop alcohol use to improve quality of life is the main treatment goal. Because denial is common, you may feel like you don’t have a problem with drinking.

Here’s what you need to know to overcome the challenges of alcohol addiction. Many health professionals can play a role in treatment. Below is a list of providers and the type of care they may offer. When asked how alcohol problems are treated, people commonly think of 12-step programs or 28-day inpatient rehab but 9 best online sobriety support groups may have difficulty naming other options. In fact, there are a variety of treatment methods currently available, thanks to significant advances in the field over the past 60 years. Millions of readers rely on HelpGuide.org for free, evidence-based resources to understand and navigate mental health challenges.

While you can’t do the hard work of overcoming addiction for your loved one, your patience, love, and support can play a crucial part in their long-term recovery. It’s important to have people you can talk honestly and openly with about what you’re going through. Turn to trusted friends, a support group, people in your faith community, or your own therapist. A good place to start is by joining a group such as Al-Anon, a free peer support group for families dealing with a loved one’s alcohol abuse.

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